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Updated Framework Guidelines for Energy Efficiency Standards in Buildings - United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE)

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The Joint Task Force on Energy Efficiency Standards in Buildings of the Group of Experts on Energy Efficiency was established in 2015 by the Committee on Sustainable Energy and the Committee on Urban Development, Housing and Land Management for 2016–2017 with a possibility of extension. Its mandate was extended for the period of 2018–2019, and further for the period of 2020–2021 with a possibility of extension.

 

The Joint Task Force on Energy Efficiency Standards in Buildings developed the Framework Guidelines for Energy Efficiency Standards in Buildings (ECE/ENERGY/GE.6/2017/4), and in 2017 the Committee on Sustainable Energy and the Committee on Urban Development, Housing and Land Management endorsed the document.

 

To deploy the Framework Guidelines for Energy Efficiency Standards in Buildings and to set in motion the process of setting up international centres of excellence and a consortium of educational and research institutions, and thereby to accelerate transformation of the world’s building stock, the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe launched a programme on high-performance buildings.The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe continues to maintain the Framework Guidelines for Energy Efficiency Standards in Buildings and keep them updated.

 

In view of this, the Work Plan of the Group of Experts on Energy Efficiency for 2020–2021 (ECE/ENERGY/2019/8) set the objective to further review and update the document, as needed. The related 21-day review process was organized involving the expert community ofthe Group of Experts on Energy Efficiency. This document contains the revised Framework Guidelines for Energy Efficiency Standards in Buildings, improved as deemed necessary.

 

Buildings are central to meeting the sustainability challenge. In the developed world, buildings consume over 70 percent of the electrical power generated and 40 percent of primary energy and are responsible for 40 percent of carbon dioxide emissions from related fuel combustion. While developing countries will need to accommodate 2.4 billion new urban residents by 2050, in Europe 75-90 percent of buildings standing today are expected to remain in use in 2050.

 

Renewable energy technology alone cannot meet those requirements, despite recent improvements. The energy performance of buildings must be managed, but the capability to meet this challenge is in place.

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