greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions

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The Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) has published its Energy- Related CO₂ Emissions in Ireland report. The report shows that energy-related CO₂ emissions declined slightly in 2018, even as energy use increased. This was due to changes in the mix of fuels used, particularly for electricity generation, where more renewable energy and less coal was used. However, the overall reduction was not enough to keep Ireland on track to meet long term decarbonisation goals.  
Post date: 17 Mar 2020
Type: Publication

This report aims to identify key orientations for the establishment of long-term decarbonisation strategy for Belgium. It draws on a wide range of quantitative and qualitative analyses, policy documents and scenario modelling for 2050.  
Post date: 18 Feb 2020
Type: Publication

This policy brief presents insights into how the buildings sector could contribute to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2050, thanks to the help of the newly developed European Calculator (EUCalc) model. The model shows that achieving EU climate neutrality will require a transformative approach both in the building sector and regarding how electricity and heat are produced.  
Post date: 12 Feb 2020
Type: Publication

Within the 2030 climate and energy framework, the European Union (EU) has committed to several key targets for 2021-2030. The overall target for 2030 is to cut the energy system greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by at least 40% as compared to the 1990 levels. Furthermore, the Renewable Energy Directive requires a binding minimum share of 32% of renewable energy for final energy use as EU-average.  The Energy Efficiency Directive sets an indicative target of at least 32.5% improvement in energy efficiency by 2030 at EU level versus the projections.  
Post date: 10 Feb 2020
Type: Publication

The production and use of energy across economic sectors account for more than 75% of the EU’s greenhouse gas emissions. Energy efficiency (EE) must be prioritised. If we all want to go towards electrification, digitalisation and all the necessary elements that a successful and just transition entails, we need to cut radically our energy demand, by half by 2050 in comparison to 2005, says the Commission.  
Post date: 3 Feb 2020
Type: News

This interview addresses the near future of the European flat glass industry under the building renovation wave. The flat glass industry is expected to grow significantly in the next years in order to respond to the European Green Deal´s targets.  
Post date: 3 Feb 2020
Type: News

Today there is an urgent need to scale up progress towards energy efficiency in buildings. Energy efficiency is also one of the pillars of a climate mitigation strategy and a critical element to meeting the Global Sustainable Development Goals. It is acknowledged how energy consumption in buildings is an important contributor to global emissions of greenhouse gases and harmful pollutants. Indeed, in 2017 buildings and appliances accounted for around 30% of global final energy use.  
Post date: 28 Gen 2020
Type: Publication

Novel building Integration Designs for increased Efficiencies in Advanced Climatically Tunable Renewable Energy Systems
Post date: 9 Gen 2020
Type: Link

In accordance with the Carbon-Neutral Helsinki 2035 Action Plan, the city launched 147 measures to reduce emissions and to attain the goal of carbon neutrality. This means that after 2035, activities taking place in Helsinki will not contribute to future warming of the climate. No greenhouse gases will be emitted from transportation and the city’s buildings will be heated and electricity produced without resulting emissions.  
Post date: 8 Gen 2020
Type: News

Challenge   The building sector is accountable for 40% of the energy consumed and 36% of carbon emissions in the EU. Approximately one-third of the buildings currently in use are more than 50 years old, having little or no renewable energy sources (RES) installed.  
Post date: 3 Gen 2020
Type: Link