Environmental issues related to buildings

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Making our buildings climate-proof is not only about reducing the 36% of CO2 emissions they are responsible for, but about doing so while caring for the people that live in them. That’s why the transformation of the buildings sector must have a prominent role in the EGD.  
Post date: 6 Feb 2020
Type: Publication

The 22nd of January the ALDREN project organised an event in the European parliament with the support and participation of several Members of the European Parliament (MEP), hosted by MEP Ljudmila Novak, and the European Commission, on the topic “ALDREN Alliance for Deep RENovation in buildings: encouraging investments and accelerating the movement towards a nearly zero-energy non-residential building stock”.
Post date: 5 Feb 2020
Type: News

The European project HOUSEFUL has released a video to invite key stakeholders in the housing sector to join a series of co-creation workshops. The workshops aim to socially validate the circular solutions developed by HOUSEFUL and make buildings more sustainable  
Post date: 5 Feb 2020
Type: News

Brand new info material for ZERO-PLUS has been prepared recently, highlighting the concept of the residential settlements of the future. The info material consists of a Roll Up banner, a poster and a brochure and includes topics such as the ZERO-PLUS approach, the main objectives of the programme, the presentation of the Case Studies, as well as the innovative techniques used.  
Post date: 3 Feb 2020
Type: News

The production and use of energy across economic sectors account for more than 75% of the EU’s greenhouse gas emissions. Energy efficiency (EE) must be prioritised. If we all want to go towards electrification, digitalisation and all the necessary elements that a successful and just transition entails, we need to cut radically our energy demand, by half by 2050 in comparison to 2005, says the Commission.  
Post date: 3 Feb 2020
Type: News

As a high-level group of CEOs, academics and politicians gathered in Brussels last week to discuss the future of the glass industry, they recognised how glass is a material which is used everywhere, from smartphones to cars, from ovens to buildings. The reason glass is everywhere is because as a transparent material, it serves a unique function for which mankind has found no substitute. This could make the sector a low-hanging fruit in lowering Europe’s emissions.  
Post date: 3 Feb 2020
Type: News

European leaders agreed in December that Europe would adopt a net-zero emission target for 2050 which would be put into legislation in March of this year. The European Commission issued a list of initiatives to respond to the ambitious goal of reaching carbon neutrality for all. This includes a "renovation wave" whose details will be clarified at the end of 2020.  
Post date: 3 Feb 2020
Type: News

This interview addresses the near future of the European flat glass industry under the building renovation wave. The flat glass industry is expected to grow significantly in the next years in order to respond to the European Green Deal´s targets.  
Post date: 3 Feb 2020
Type: News

Sustainable Energy for All (SEforALL) is an international organization working with leaders in government, the private sector and civil society to drive further, faster action toward achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 7 (SDG7), which calls for universal access to sustainable energy by 2030, and the Paris Agreement, which calls for reducing greenhouse gas emissions to limit climate warming to below 2° Celsius.  
Post date: 31 Gen 2020
Type: Link

Children are spending more and more time inside buildings and the indoor air quality can affect their health. In fact, air pollution has been linked to serious health conditions, such as cancer, asthma and cardiovascular diseases.   The indoor air quality changes according to the building, the occupants, and the type of activities taking place inside. The main way people are exposed is by inhaling pollutants, but they can also be ingested or absorbed through the skin. This set of complex factors include:  
Post date: 31 Gen 2020
Type: Publication