net zero carbon

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The European Union aims to be climate-neutral by 2050, requiring a fundamental transformation of the construction and building sectors. This decade is critical as direct building CO2 emissions need to more than halve by 2030 to get on track for a net-zero carbon building stock by 2050.  
Post date: 17 mai 2021
Type: Publication

With the drive towards reducing in-use energy to “nearly zero”, sources of carbon emissions from buildings, beyond in-use operational energy demand, become increasingly important and therefore a vital part of future carbon reduction plans. This policy briefing demonstrates that carbon metrics are needed to align building policies and incentives with carbon-neutrality goals.
Post date: 17 mai 2021
Type: Publication

Greening our homes and public buildings is crucial to achieving the EU’s  medium and long-term climate goals. For this reason, we welcome the revision of the EU’s Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD).
Post date: 11 mai 2021
Type: Publication

The Net Zero Building Conference is an online conference which is being held on April 22nd 2021. The event is focused on delivering sustainable buildings in the commercial & industrial sector. The event will run live online from 10am to 4pm GMT. The sessions will also be available for download by participants following the event.  
Post date: 9 avr 2021
Type: Évènement

The World Energy Transitions Outlook preview outlines a pathway for the world to achieve the Paris Agreement goals and halt the pace of climate change by transforming the global energy landscape. This preview presents options to limit global temperature rise to 1.5°C and bring CO2 emissions closer to net-zero by mid-century, offering high-level insights on technology choices, investment needs and the socio-economic contexts of achieving a sustainable, resilient and inclusive energy future.  
Post date: 30 mar 2021
Type: Publication

Registration   This web conference will be animated during the week by Frédéric Musselin (EM SREB graduate), Bruno Mesureur (International Consultant in Construction) and moderated by Stéphanie Merger (EM SREB student) and Karen Peyronnin (Head of Executive Masters at Ecole des Ponts ParisTech).   The objectives of this international web conference will be:  
Post date: 29 mar 2021
Type: Évènement

Concept:   Concrete is one of the most consumed materials on the planet. It is cost-effective and efficient for the construction of buildings and infrastructure, making it almost irreplaceable in the construction sector.   Unfortunately, cement (material used to bind concrete together) has an enormous carbon footprint, emitting large amounts of CO2 during its production.  
Post date: 10 mar 2021
Type: Lien

CO2 emissions increased to 9.95 GtCO2 in 2019. The sector accounts for 38% of all energy-related CO2 emissions when adding building construction industry emissions. Direct building CO2 emissions need to halve by 2030 to get on track for net zero carbon building stock by 2050. Governments must prioritize low-carbon buildings in pandemic stimulus packages and updated climate pledges.
Post date: 2 jan 2021
Type: Actualité

Although cutting emissions to net-zero by 2050 will destroy jobs and push up the costs of doing business in some sectors, it will bring gains elsewhere that will make up for the difference, according to a new study by McKinsey & company.   “Net-zero emissions by 2050 should be achievable at a net-zero cost without compromising overall economic growth or prosperity,” says the study by the global consulting firm, published on Thursday (3 December).   
Post date: 6 déc 2020
Type: Actualité

“Net-Zero” and “Passive House” are certification labels for ultra-low energy buildings that use very little energy to heat and cool them.   Although the origins of the passive house date back to the 1970s, its popularity only began to spread in the past decade or so.  
Post date: 27 nov 2020
Type: Actualité